The quick and easy way to the world's oil and gas jobs

ignite

WHEN THE HUNTER BECOMES THE HUNTED…

 

 

Looking for the best jobs in the oil and gas industry is a far simpler process today (thanks in no small part to OilCareers.com, of course!) but increasingly recruiters are turning the process on its head.

 

Energy sector companies have rightly bemoaned the lack of skilled employees the world over, insisting the best candidates are tough to track down.

 

While many companies are now successfully hitting targets on graduate and trainee recruitment, a major challenge facing the industry is the recruitment of those with five or more years of relevant experience – people able to ‘hit the ground running’ and drive major projects forward quickly and competently.

 

Now some of the largest organisations are making even more of an effort to put themselves in front of the right audience, rather than just waiting for the proverbial knock on the door.

 

A perfect example of this approach was the ignite! Energy Recruitment Show at the Gastech Conference & Exhibition in London last month, which offered a unique opportunity to engineers wishing to learn about many global opportunities available, and to the employers out there who are hiring. Much more than a ‘jobs fair’, ignite! was dedicated to helping global employers source talent for specific projects, matching skillsets to regional projects which are under development.

 

As you would expect, we were there to help “marry up” candidates with employers, and lend our own expertise on how best the industry can address the dearth of personnel.

 

The event was held from 8-11 October, at the ExCeL, and proved a huge hit with employers and job hunters alike, with more than 30 major global operators, producers and engineering contractors sharing employment opportunities and around 3,000 interested candidates visiting the stands and training seminars that were on offer.

 

One of the most popular sessions was the Development of Human Capital panel, which focussed on training. Sarah Beacock, professional affairs director at the Energy Institute, told the audience that training was vital in the workplace but also important for those focusing on professional development ­so the skills they learn with their current employer can help throughout the rest of their careers. Her advice to young people was “volunteer for everything”, explaining that employers will always appreciate this approach.

 

The session, which also discussed how young people find it increasingly challenging to get into the oil and gas industry, heard from Ieda Gomes, managing director at Energix Strategy Ltd. She explained that western companies tend to have more ageing workforces, whereas Latin American and Middle East organisations have a younger technical staff base. She went on to say that the energy industry needed to paint a different picture to the young people of today, to show them that many opportunities – besides engineering jobs – are on offer.

 

The ignite! event was a great example of the innovative approaches being taken by employers, as they hunt for those hunting for the best jobs on offer. Our own research shows that demand for engineers in the energy sector peaked this year at an astonishing 89,688 open positions – with such competition among employers for the talent out there, it seems likely that more and more companies will be willing to think outside the box when it comes to landing the top talent.

| More

Oil & Gas sector knows of skill shortages

Oil & Gas sector knows of skill shortages – but what exactly to do about it?

The oil & gas sector needs no educating on the severe lack of skilled engineers coming into the industry, especially in a time of major international growth and development for E&P firms. And while many companies are now successfully hitting targets on graduate and trainee recruitment, the real problem facing the industry is the recruitment of those with five years or more relevant experience – personnel able to ‘hit the ground running’ and drive forward major projects quickly and competently.

OPITO, the UK oil & gas industry’s training body, recently reported that 44% of companies are expecting significant growth this year – so where will the staff come from to fill these gaps in engineering expertise and management of project development and delivery? Skills shortages were the biggest challenge to the sector’s growth, the report found, and with around 15,000 more jobs potentially being filled in the next five years, the demand for engineers with the necessary skillset was greater than ever. Without it, wage inflation could run out of control.

In another survey carried out by a team at Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, 110 companies were asked about their growth prospects. Nine out of 10 anticipated a boost in their international activity, with 67% expecting significant growth as a result of decommissioning work from the North Sea, plus a further 63% expected growth due to renewable energy contracts. The managing director of OPITO, David Binne, remarked that; “…spend on existing projects will… potentially rise to £40 billion… targeted at around 33 new platforms, 12 major asset modifications and 40 subsea tie-backs. This is a startling set of opportunities and our estimates suggest that over 15,000 new posts will be required over the next five years to deliver these project plans.

“Meeting that challenge and increasing the supply pool of experienced talent is critical if we are to avoid inter-company competition, cost inflation and the delay or cancellation of projects.”

Many countries in emerging and developing regions are also seeking to attract talent with the skills to implement exploration, production and delivery of hydrocarbons projects. Additionally, an increase in the number of operators venturing into new frontiers in shale gas and deep water, matched with increasing demand for LNG and the huge potential reserves identified in the likes of Colombia, Angola and the Barents Sea, brings a need for people with specific experience, particularly in the fields of specialist engineering and in the subsea sector.

According to Oilcareers.com, one of the world’s largest oil and gas careers websites, demand for engineers in the energy sector peaked this year at an astonishing 89,688 open positions. At the start of this year OilCareers.com experienced a record-breaking one million visits in a month, a first since its launch 10 years ago.

With such competition among employers for the talent out there, the suggestions are that more pressure will be placed on salaries as employees with relevant skills find themselves cherished and fought over by companies.

But, one interesting new initiative that has recently been launched to assist employers struggling to recruit talent might hold some answers.  A dedicated energy recruitment and workforce development show is to be co-located with the ‘Gastech’ international conference and exhibition this October in London, which will offer a unique opportunity to engineers wishing to learn about many global opportunities available, and of the employers out there who are hiring. More than just a recruitment fair, the ‘ignite!’ show is dedicated to helping employers from around the world source talent for specific projects, matching skillsets to specific regional projects being developed.

Taking place during the ‘Gastech’ international conference & exhibition on the 8th – 11th October, at the ExCel centre in London’s docklands, the ‘ignite!’ show has already proved a huge hit with employers and potential skilled candidates alike, with over 30 major global operators, producers and engineering contractors sharing employment opportunities in their key global projects, and around 3,000 interested candidates expected to visit the stands and training seminars on offer.

It is clear that as companies focus more urgently on their engineering recruitment, the competition for securing the best talent available has never been greater.

To learn more about the ‘ignite!’ show please visit the website:  www.igniteyourcareer.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| More

Disclaimer: Any views here do not necessarily reflect the views of OilCareers Ltd. As such we cannot be held responsible for the views expressed here or any actions taken as a consequence.